May is...

Maternal Mental Health Week
(May 2 - 8)

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Maternal Mental Health Stats:

  • Less than 15% of women diagnosed with a maternal mental health disorder receive treatment. With increased demand and barriers to mental health care because of the pandemic, even fewer moms received treatment.1,2,3

  • 1 in 5 women on average suffer from maternal mental health disorders. Roughly 1 in 5 women are not asked about depression during prenatal visits despite universal screening being recommended4

  • 1 in 5 women on average suffer from maternal mental health disorders. Up to 50% of women living in poverty will suffer from a maternal mental health disorder.5,6

  • 1 in 5 women on average suffer from maternal mental health disorders. #MaternalMentalHealth disorders like postpartum depression are the #1 complication of childbirth.7

  • 1 in 5 women on average suffer from maternal mental health disorders. 34% of new mothers report experiencing a traumatic childbirth.8

  • 1 in 5 women on average suffer from maternal mental health disorders. Women in their childbearing years account for the largest group with depression in the U.S.9

  • 1 in 5 women on average suffer from maternal mental health disorders. #MaternalMentalHealth disorders are much more than the baby blues and consist of a range of mental health conditions such as depression, anxiety, OCD and PTSD.10

  • 1 in 5 women on average suffer from maternal mental health disorders. Up to fifteen percent (15%) of women will develop anxiety during pregnancy or after childbirth.11

  • 1 in 5 women on average suffer from maternal mental health disorders. 70-100% of women (and their partners) have “intrusive” thoughts surrounding childbirth/the postpartum period.12

  • 1 in 5 women on average suffer from maternal mental health disorders. Asian women are nearly 9 times as likely to report thoughts about suicide compared to white women in the immediate postpartum period.13

Learn more

World Pre-Eclampsia Awareness

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KEY STATISTICS ABOUT PREECLAMPSIA

  • Hypertensive disorders of pregnancy (HDPs) complicate 5-10% of all pregnancies worldwide. They include:

    • preeclampsia (with or without severe features),

    • eclampsia (seizures),

    • HELLP syndrome (hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes, low platelets),

    • gestational hypertension.[i]

  • Preeclampsia is most often characterized by a rapid rise in blood pressure that can lead to:

    • seizure,

    • stroke,

    • multiple organ failure,

    • death of the mother and/or baby.

  • HDPs are a leading cause of maternal and infant death worldwide[ii], with the majority of these deaths happening in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs).

  • Approximately 76,000 women and 500,000 babies die each year worldwide.[iii] 

  • The United States currently ranks 47th worldwide for maternal mortality, and is the only industrialized nation with a rising maternal mortality rate.[iv]

  • HDPs, including preeclampsia, are a leading cause of maternal and infant illness and death here in the United States.[v]

  • Black women experience severe maternal morbidity events at a rate 2.1 times greater than white women.[vi]

Learn more

National Teen Pregnancy Prevention 

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Many younger teens give birth at ages 15 to 17.

More than 1 in 4 teens who give birth are ages 15-17.

  • Hispanic, non-Hispanic black and American Indian/Alaska Native teens have higher rates of teen births.

  • Only 38% of teens who gave birth at age 17 or younger earned high school diplomas by their 22nd birthday versus 60% of teen who were 18 or older when they gave birth. Among teens not giving birth, 89% earned high school diplomas.

Sexually active teens need ready access to effective and affordable types of birth control.

  • Long-acting reversible contraception (LARC) including intrauterine devices (IUDs) and hormonal implants are the most effective reversible methods. These methods do not require taking a pill each day or doing something each time before having sex.

  • Nine in 10 (92%) younger teens ages 15 to 17 used birth control the last time they had sex, but only 1% used LARC. The most common methods used were condoms and birth control pills.

There are effective ways to prevent pregnancy among younger teens ages 15-17.

  • About 8 in 10 (83%) teens did not receive sex education before they first had sex. Earlier delivery of sex education may enhance prevention efforts.

  • More than 7 in 10 (76%) spoke to their parents about birth control or about not having sex. Parents play a powerful role in helping teens make healthy decisions about sex, sexuality, and relationships.

  • More than half (58%) of sexually active younger teens made a reproductive health visit for birth control services in the past year. Doctors and nurses could use this opportunity to discuss advantages and disadvantages of different contraceptive methods and the importance of condom use during every sexual encounter.

Children's Mental Health Awareness Week
(May 3 - 9)

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What Is Children’s Mental Health?

Español (Spanish)

Learn more about mental health, mental disorders, treatments, prevention, and public health research on children’s mental health.

Being mentally healthy during childhood means reaching developmental and emotional milestones and learning healthy social skills and how to cope when there are problems. Mentally healthy children have a positive quality of life and can function well at home, in school, and in their communities.

Mental disorders among children are described as serious changes in the way children typically learn, behave, or handle their emotions, which cause distress and problems getting through the day. Many children occasionally experience fears and worries or display disruptive behaviors. If symptoms are serious and persistent and interfere with school, home, or play activities, the child may be diagnosed with a mental disorder.

Learn more

National Women's Health Week
(May 9 - 15)

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World No Tobbaco

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