November is ...

Prematurity Awareness

In 2018, 1 in 10 babies was born too early in the United States. Learn about the problem, risk factors, and what we can do to reduce premature birth.

About Premature Birth

A developing baby goes through important growth throughout pregnancy—including in the final months and weeks. Premature (also known as preterm) birth is when a baby is born too early, before 37 weeks of pregnancy have been completed. The earlier a baby is born, the higher the risk of death or serious disability. In 2017, preterm birth and low birth weight accounted for about 17% of infant deaths. Babies who survive can have breathing issues, intestinal (digestive) problems, and bleeding in their brains. Long-term problems may include developmental delay (not meeting the developmental milestones for his or her age) and lower performance in school.

  

Learn more from CDC.gov

Learn more from March of Dimes

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Food Safety for Special Events, Seasons & Holidays

Make food safety a part of your party, holiday or event plans.  Follow these tips to stay healthy while cooking for parties and during special events and holiday celebrations.

Pregnant Women

Pregnant womenexternal icon are more likely than other people to get sick from certain germs. For example, pregnant women are 10 times more likely to get a Listeria infection.

Children Younger Than 5 Years

Young childrenexternal icon have immune systems that are still developing, so their body’s ability to fight germs and sickness isn’t as strong. Food poisoning can be particularly dangerous for them because illness can lead to diarrhea and dehydration. Children younger than 5 are three times more likely to be hospitalized if they get a Salmonella infection. And kidney failure strikes 1 out of 7 children under age 5 who are diagnosed with E. coli O157 infection.

Learn more from CDC

Pregnant Travelers During The Holidays

Pregnant women can generally travel safely with a little preparation. But they should avoid some destinations, including those with Zika and malaria risk. Learn about steps you can take if you’re pregnant and planning an international trip, especially to a developing country. Follow these tips to keep you and your baby safe and healthy.

Learn more from CDC

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